New York New York. Arte italiana: la riscoperta dell’America

From the left: Lucio Fontana, Spatial concept, New York Skyscraper, 1962, copper - Pietro Consagra, New York City, 1962, steel and bronze

13 april - 17 september 2017
Milan, Museo del Novecento

From 13 April to 17 September, 2017 the exhibition NEW YORK NEW YORK Arte Italiana: La riscoperta dell’America, is open to the public. curated by Francesco Tedeschi with Francesca Pola and Federica Boragina, promoted by the Municipality of Milan – Culture, Museo del Novecento and Intesa Sanpaolo – Gallerie d’Italia, in collaboration with Electa.
The exhibition presents, through their works, the stories of Italian artists who have traveled, stayed, worked, exhibited in the United States, and in particular in New York, or just imagined the new world, all looking for a freer spirit and different models compared to old Europe.
The exhibition route winds through the two museums, including about 150 works: the American imagery is returned to the spaces of the Museo del Novecento and, in particular, the intense relationship with the city of New York as perceived by Italian artists, with works by Afro, Paolo Baratella, Corrado Cagli, Pietro Consagra, Giorgio De Chirico, Fortunato Depero, Tano Festa, Lucio Fontana, Emilio Isgrò, Sergio Lombardo, Titina Maselli, Costantino Nivola, Gastone Novelli, Vinicio Paladini, Arnaldo Pomodoro, Mimmo Rotella , Alberto Savinio, Toti Scialoja, Tancredi, Giulio Turcato. A section in itself will be dedicated to the photographic work of Ugo Mulas in relation to New York and American artists.
Then we continue to the Galleries of Italy where we can retrace the exhibitions organized in the United States that have featured Italian artists. Starting from the exhibition “XX Century Italian Art”, held in 1949 at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, some masterpieces of artists such as Umberto Boccioni, Giacomo Balla, Carlo Carrà and Giorgio Morandi were presented in the halls of Piazza Scala. continue with works by authors of the fifties and sixties.

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